Readers Write: More re: evolution and entropy

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Editor:

Tom Evans recently wrote that there is an entropy problem with evolution. This simply is not true.

The popular conception of entropy is that it is a measure of “organization” and that systems always proceed toward greater entropy, which means they become more disorganized.  This definition is not correct.

As an example, I offer the following.: Start with a collection of hydrogen atoms that are randomly organized in space.  Gravity pulls them together into a sphere so they are already “organizing.”

If enough atoms collect, the pressure becomes extreme and the hydrogen atoms fuse together to form helium.  This is a burning star like our Sun.  Stars that go supernova can then produce a whole variety of heavier elements that we find on our periodic table.

So, we start with a random collection of atoms that first becomes a burning star and then produces a plethora of organized heavy atoms. Absolutely no “intelligent energy” is required.

I suggest “Astrophysics For People In a Hurry” by Neil deGrasse Tyson as a fabulous reference for how the universe got to where we are today.

Stephen Robb

Fountain Hills, AZ

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